No More Short Rows: Winged Crescent Shawls

Crescents have been very popular shawl shapes for a few years and don’t seem to lose any popularity among knitters all over the world so far. Guess it’s time to devote some time to explain crescent shawls in detail: how do they look like, and how can they be constructed?

Please note: this is the third part of the Complete Guide to Crescent Shawls. You can find the first one (and links to all the other parts) here:

>> The Complete Guide to Crescent Shawls <<

Winged Crescent Shawls

We talked about working “no more short rows” crescent shawls yesterday already, and today I’m going to equip you with another method for working crescent shawls without using any short rows: winged crescent shawls.

Winged crescent shawls – I call them winged crescents – are my invention. I designed this method of creating crescent shawl shapes after being asked a thousand times how to work crescent shawls without using short rows and being fed up with working them sideways.

Construction Principles for Winged Crescents

Winged crescents are basically half circles with additional increases on both outer sides – the wings. The schematic below shows the construction principle. As for the construction methods mentioned in earlier parts of this series, this shawl shape is finalized by blocking, too.

Winged Crescent Shawls

The main advantage (besides there are no short rows) is the level of detail for shaping the outer parts of the crescent. The added wings make fine tuning possible and rather easy here.

Pattern Template for a Winged Crescent Shawl

    • CO 6 sts and purl one row.
    • Next Row: sl1, knit to last stitch, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Next Row: sl1, (YO, k1) to last st, YO, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Next Row: sl1, knit to last stitch, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Repeat the last two rows once more. (4 rows between increases)
    • Next Row: sl1, (YO, k1) to last st, YO, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Next Row: sl1, knit to last stitch, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Repeat the last two rows 7 times more. (8 rows between increases)
    • Continue to work in the pattern for a half circle (circular segment shawl – between each increase round the amount of rows doubles, so there are 4, 8, 16, … rows between each increase round) until shawl is large enough to start the wings (the winged part on one side is approximately half of the total length, see schematic above).

At the same time (wing increases):

    • Next Row: sl1, YO, knit to last stitch, YO, ktbl.
    • Next Row: sl1 wyf, p to end.
    • Repeat the last two rows until shawl is of desired size, then bin off all sts loosely.
    • Block into crescent shape.

Not as easy as crescents worked sideways but this method is a better fit for crescent shapes.

What’s your favorite construction method?

Let me know by leaving a comment below!

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3 comments

  1. marimom says:

    You directions say “at the same time” on the next row. What row is that?
    I have my yarn and needles ready to go!!!

    • Jriede Knitwear Design says:

      The information you’re looking for is stated in the paragraph above:
      “[…] until shawl is large enough to start the wings (the winged part on one side is approximately half of the total length, see schematic above).

      At the same time (wing increases): […]”

      “At the same time” refers to the start of the wing increases.

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