Sock Knitting in Plain English Available for Pre-Order Tomorrow

Sock Knitting in Plain English

Update 2016-02-07: I received so many comments on my short survey about what this book HAS to include, I’m still busy catching up. Thanks for all your feedback, it is very, very helpful indeed! I extended the schedule for publication for a few more days to account for this. I’ll post an update as soon as I’m ready – expect it for tomorrow, Monday Feb 8th!

It’s the Final Countdown! Just two weeks from today, on February 19th, Sock Knitting in Plain English will officially launch. After months of hard work and anticipation, I am so proud to finally share this book with you.

Why I had to Write Sock Knitting in Plain English

The idea of this book wouldn’t leave my mind. I kept thinking about people wasting so much time, energy, and money trying things that would never succeed – waste that could have been prevented had these sock knitters taken the time to validate their strategies at the beginning.

In fact, the #1 question I’ve received, both via email and in private messages on other platforms is:

How do I know if what I’m working on will actually work?

After eight years of helping knitters start with and improve their sock knitting, I have literally worked with knitters on thousands of ideas. I can say with confidence that this is the book new sock knitters need most.

Sock Knitting in Plain English: How to knit socks that fit, master sock knitting techniques and fight second sock syndrome will teach you how to validate your ideas. In other words, this book is designed to help you determine if your idea for your next (or very first!) pair of socks will succeed, or if it will struggle and ultimately fail.

Sock Knitting in Plain English takes you and your ideas through extensive exercises to determine:

  • How to get started with sock knitting?
  • How do I work heels and toes?
  • How can I make sure my socks will actually fit and turn out the right size?
  • How can socks be turned into stockings by calf shaping?
  • How can sock knitting finally be something for you?

In other words, how does sock knitting work – explained in plain English?

Sock Knitting in Plain English

But you won’t have to wait until February 19th to order your very own copy. Sock Knitting in Plain English is now available for early bird order — with some very special bonuses for folks who order a copy (or three, or ten, or more!) in advance.

Early bird orders will be enabled shortly!

Order Early for Exclusive Bonuses

To thank you for your early support of the book, I’ve put together some early-bird order book bundles that I think you’ll love. Due to fulfillment options, these bundle bonuses are available only for copies of the book ordered in my shop here at jriede.com.

A kindle version of the book is not available for pre-sale but will be available on launch day, February 19th.

If you order your copy as an early bird (called “pre-order” below) now, the Ebook (PDF) version will be available for download instantly. You don’t have to wait for your copy.

To redeem your bonuses, click on the “redeem bonuses” button below, fill out your information and attach your receipt, and we’ll get you taken care of!

Buy 1 Copy: I Appreciate You! ($14 worth of bonuses)

You are:

  • Ready to jump in and get started with sock knitting!
  • Amazing, clever, and (I daresay) quite good-looking.

I am:

  • So grateful for your support!
  • Excited to see what you knit!

Pre-order the book and get the following bonuses:

  • Ebook PDF digital copy of the book (for non-Kindle e-readers)
  • Ebook PDF digital copy of my first book, Alpine Lace Stockings
  • One 60-minute exclusive webinar “Ask Julia” Q&A session with Julia (priceless)
  • Thank you card from Julia, limited to first 100 submissions (priceless)

Redeem Bonuses opening shortly!

Buy 3 Copies: Pay It Forward ($242 worth of bonuses)

You are:

  • Generous, with two friends who are lucky to know you and have your support.
  • Eager to share your excitement with friends, family, or potential business partners.
  • Ready to start building your business.

I am:

  • Eager to help you and your friends!

Order three copies of the book and get the following bonuses:

  • Everything from the I Appreciate You! bundle
  • One 90-minute exclusive webinar master class about sock knitting and design
  • Thank you mention here on the Jriede blog with a link back to your website or blog (if applicable) (priceless)

Redeem Bonuses opening shortly!

 

Buy 5 Copies: Pay It Forward (A Little More) ($282 worth of bonuses)

You are:

  • Part of a mastermind group or book club.
  • Planning to read the book with a group.

I am:

  • Excited to reward you for organizing the reading group!

Order five copies of the book and get the following bonuses:

Redeem Bonuses opening shortly!

 

Rules of Engagement

  • Bonus packages apply only to purchases of Ebook (PDF) copies of Sock Knitting in Plain English ordered in my shop here on jriede.com. International orders are eligible to receive bonuses.
  • Book bonuses are available now until 11:59 p.m. Central European on Thursday, February 18th, 2016.
  • The book bonuses that are available now are it; there will not be anything better on launch day.
  • Book bonuses apply only to pre-orders of Sock Knitting in Plain English, which must be placed before 11:59 p.m. Central European on Thursday, February 18, 2016.
  • Bonus packages are available on a first-come-first served basis, where quantities are limited.
  • Buyers are responsible for following the directions, filling out the form, and submitting their receipt. If a form entry and receipt are not received, I cannot guarantee delivery of the bonus package items.
  • Offers are good while supplies last.
  • Copies of Sock Knitting in Plain English will ship immediately in Ebook (PDF) format.
  • Digital bonuses will be delivered on or before Friday, February 19, 2016
  • All physical bonuses will ship on or before Tuesday, March 1, 2016.
  • Online webinars with Julia will be scheduled by Friday, February 19, 2016, to occur sometime after Tuesday, March 1, 2016.
  • Questions? Email jule@jriede.de.

I Appreciate You!

The most important part of this whole journey is you, the Jriede community. You have been my loyal readers, supporting me through eight years of launching new knitting projects and running tests on my patterns. You inspire me every day—to work harder and be better. Thanks for allowing me to be your knitting buddy.

Julia Riede Signature

Sock Knitting: Tips & Tricks for Stitch Pattern Adjustments

Sock Design for Everybody: Stitch Pattern Adjustments

Are you a sock knitter dying to learn how to design your own knitted socks? If your answer is “Yes!”, these sock design tutorials are the one-stop resource for you.

Sock Design For Everybody: Table of Contents


Welcome to the next part of the tutorial an sock knitting and design: Sock Design for Everybody! Today’s topic is all about adjusting stitch counts for a better overall fit.

Lace and Cable Patterns

If you knit socks in lace or cabled patterns, standard stitch counts (as for Vanilla socks) might be not suitable:

  • Lace patterns will yield a different (smaller) gauge as standard stockinette because they are stretchier.
  • The opposite is the case for cable and twisted stitch patterns: they tend to be tighter in gauge (being knitted at a larger gauge).
  • For ribbed patterns, the numbers also might have to be adjusted.

For cables, twisted stitches and ribbed patterns go up one or two sizes in needle size; for lace patterns, go down one size. An alternative is to adjust your stitch counts: more stitches for cabled, less for lace patterns.

Socks for Kids

Kids, especially babies and toddlers, have thicker legs when compared to adults. If using cabled or twisted stitch patterns, make sure to go up one size or two in circumference to ensure these wee feet and legs fit into their socks. Lacy or otherwise stretchy patterns usually require no adjustments in circumference.

Are You Into Sock Knitting Pattern Adjustments Already?

Which way of adjusting stitch count in sock knitting your number one? I’m curious to hear your story – please leave a comment below!

Happy knitting,

Julia

Sock Design: From Socks to Stockings: Calf Shaping

Sock Design for Everybody: Calf Shaping

Are you a sock knitter dying to learn how to design your own knitted socks? If your answer is “Yes!”, these sock design tutorials are the one-stop resource for you.

Sock Design For Everybody: Table of Contents


Welcome to the next part of the tutorial an sock knitting and design: Sock Design for Everybody! Today’s topic is all about calf shaping: when do you need calf shaping – and why?

Calf Anatomy

You all know I’m attending Med School, so I’m pleased to introduce calf shaping in sock knitting from an anatomy perspective today! Let’s have a look on human calves: why do they look that way after all?
Sock Design for Everybody: Calf Shaping Anatomy
The anatomy of calves: why do look calves as they do?

 

Your calves are shaped by a muscle group called Musculus triceps surae, consisting of three parts: Musculus gastrocnemius (Caput laterale and mediale) and Musculus soleus.
Men’s calves are usually more prominent than women’s. Men’s stockings definitely need calf shaping, but it’s a nice feature anyway – women come in many different shapes, too!
So let’s talk about shaping: how can calf shaping be achieved in sock knitting?

Calf Shaping in Sock Knitting

Calf shaping is achieved by increasing (or decreasing, when working top down) your stitch count from the point on where your calf starts. For me, this is about 6 inches (15 cm) measured from the start of the leg section after working the heel (yes, I’m working toe-up mostly).
For women’s socks, I’m increasing from my standard 60 stitches to 80 (ish), for men’s socks I’m increasing to 96 stitches. You want your increases to be more at the beginning (say, two stitches every other round), then switching to two stitches every 4th round after approximately 6-8 increase rounds.
An example chart (taken from one of my Alpine sock knitting patterns) is shown below.
Sock Knitting: An Example Chart for Calf Shaping
Sock Knitting: An Example Chart for Calf Shaping

Do You Knit Stockings?

And if yes, how do you implement calf shaping? I’m curious to hear your story – please leave a comment below!

Happy knitting,

Julia

Exam Weeks: Sorry For Eventual Delays

Winter Term Exam Weeks

Hello everybody,

as you might have heard already, I’m in Med School and this and next week are our winter term exam weeks. As I’m planning to pass all my exams, some delays with scheduled posts – like the sock design series – might occur.

It won’t be a matter more than a day or two, promise – I hope you understand!

Just to let you know – yes, I’m still out there, just extraordinary busy with my “other” daily life besides knitting these days. To be honest, I’d rather be knitting at the moment. I’m at a point where I’m just fed up with studying, time to finish this term and move on!

Thanks for your patience!

Have a very nice weekend,

Julia

Sock Design: How To Knit Sock Heels

Sock Design for Everybody: Sock Heels

Are you a sock knitter dying to learn how to design your own knitted socks? If your answer is “Yes!”, these sock design tutorials are the one-stop resource for you.

Sock Design For Everybody: Table of Contents


Welcome to the next part of the tutorial an sock knitting and design: Sock Design for Everybody! Today’s topic is all about sock heels: which sock eels are out there, and when to work which one?

There’s myriad of sock heel variants out there in the knitting wild: flap heels, round heels, short row heels, afterthought heels are just a few of them. My all-time favorite are German short row heels but I enjoy working a Dutch heel occasionally, too – especially when knitting my socks top-down.

Dutch sock heel
Silberbaum, an example of a sock pattern using the Dutch Heel.

Back in 2013, I wrote a comprehensive series about sock heels here on my blog: Heel Week: Five Ways of Knitting Sock Heels.

Heel Week featured German short row heels, the Dutch Heel, Toe Up Flap Heels, Standard Flap Heels and Hat Heels and is your first stop for learning about different sock heel techniques and how to knit them. Just follow the link above!

An example of standard flap heel socks worked top-down.
An example of standard flap heel socks worked top-down.

Stitch Patterns in Sock Heels

When knitting socks, I mostly chose two stitch pattern variants for their heels: plain stockinette (or reverse stockinette) stitch, and slip-stitch ribbing. To add extra durability, you can use reinforcement yarn (thin polyester thread) together with the main yarn during heel knitting. The latter was a commonly used technique for sock knitting in the 1980s where I grew up and some knitters still swear it’s the best thing ever.

Personally, I don’t care much for polyester yarns at all, and reinforcement yarn is no exception. I have to admit it has its advantages, though – there are quite a few pairs of socks in my drawers with holes in their heels due to heavy wear; maybe reinforcing the heel could have prevented this.

Do you have a preferred method of knitting sock heels?

Which way of knitting sock heels is your number one? I’m curious to hear your story – please leave a comment below!

Happy knitting,

Julia