Shawl Design For Everybody: Triangle Shawl Pattern (sideways)

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the second part of the triangle shawl week of Shawl Design for Everybody! Today's topic in our shawl design course are triangle shawl patterns worked bottom-up with asymmetrical increases, a.k.a. triangle shawls worked sideways. In German speaking countries, this shawl shape is often referred to as Josephinentuch, and it's the perfect pattern if you want to knit an adjustable triangle shawl.

triangle shawl pattern sideways
Increases worked every row result in an increase angle of approximately 60°.

Working a triangular shawl from bottom up means starting at the tip, increasing to a certain size and binding off after adding a little border at the upper side of the triangle if desired. In the case of asymmetrical increases (working sideways), the increases are worked on one side only.

Don't let the images mislead you: the grid is square but gauge usually is not! Therefor, the images do not reflect the resulting angles accurately.

triangle shawl sideways
Increases every other row yield angles of approximately 45°.

 

Design Process Outline

The outline of the shawl design process for square shawls tip to tip is as follows.

  1. Work a swatch and measure gauge.
  2. CO 3 sts and purl one row.
  3. Work increase rows (alternated with plain rows on demand, depending on the angle to be achieved) until shawl is of desired width.
  4. Optionally work an edging o the upper side of the triangle.
  5. Bind off all stitsches loosely and block gently.

shawl design triangle shawls

 

Knitting Pattern Template

Our example assumes we are working no edging together with the shawl body.

Work a swatch and measure gauge. Example: 5 sts / 6 rows per square inch.

Decide on the desired width at the upper side of the triangle and the desired increase rate (how many plain rows to be worked between the increase rows). Example: 15 inches total width, increases every second row.

Calculate the relevant stitch counts: we need

15 inches * 5 stitches/inch = 75 stitches

total width.

So our pattern template reads as follows:


CO 3 sts and purl one round.

Increase row: sl1, YO, k to end of row. (5 sts)

Next row: knit.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 75 stitches total.

Bind off all sts loosely, then weave in ends and block gently.


Our series will be continued on Friday covering triangles worked top down. Please check back if you enjoyed this tutorial!

See you,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design For Everybody: Triangle shawls bottom-up (symmetrical increases)

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today's topic in our shawl design course are triangle shawls worked bottom-up with symmetrical increases.

Working a triangular shawl diagonally means starting at one tip, increasing to a certain size and binding off after adding a little border at the upper side of the triangle.

Adjustable Shawls jriede Hannah

The increase angle can be selected at will. Increase two stitches every other row for an increase angle of 90° for instance.

In this setup is possible (and common) to work the edging at the same time as the shawl body. Either way, we start with casting on three stitches and increasing continually until the shawl is of desired width (or height).

square shawls tip to tip
When working the edging together with the shawl body, the section outlined in orange has to be worked first during setup.

Design Process Outline

The outline of the shawl design process for square shawls tip to tip is as follows.

  1. Work a swatch and measure gauge.
  2. CO 3 sts and purl one row.
  3. Optional (with edging): work increase rows until edging is of desired width (upper edge of the orange triangle shown above).
  4. Work increase rows until shawl is of desired width.
  5. Optionally work an edging o the upper side of the triangle.
  6. Bind off all stitsches loosely and block gently.

shawl design triangle shawls

 

Knitting Pattern Template

Our example assumes we are working a garter stitch edging together with the shawl body. The width of the edging (upper edge of the orange triangle) shall be two inches (one inch per side).

Work a swatch and measure gauge. Example: 5 sts / 6 rows per square inch.

Decide on the desired width at the upper side of the triangle. Example: 30 inches total width (incl. edging).

Calculate the relevant stitch counts: we need 6 stitches per side for the edging, (5 stitches per inch plus one selvedge stitch on the outer side) and

30 inches * 5 stitches/inch = 150 stitches

total width.

So our pattern template reads as follows:


CO 3 sts and purl one round.

Increase row: sl1, m1R, pm, ktbl, pm, m1L, k1. (5 sts)

Next row: knit.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, m1R, slm, ktbl, slm, m1L, k to end of row. (7 sts)

Next row: knit.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 13 sts total, then start shawl body:

Increase row:sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, ktbl, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, k to next marker, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 151 stitches between the markers.

Work eight rows (four ridges) of garter stitch.

Weave in ends and block gently.


Our series will be continued tomorrow covering asymmetric triangle shawls. Please check back if you enjoyed this tutorial!

Julia Riede Signature

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design For Everybody: Adjustable Square Shawls

New here? Feeling lost? Find the shawl design course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the shawl design course.

shawl design for everybody

Welcome to part four of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today's topic in our shawl design course is how to turn square shawls and stoles into patterns for adjustable square shawls (and stoles).

What means adjustable in this context? Assume your yarn supply is limited, for example you only got one skein of a specific yarn you plan to use for a shawl. How do you make sure you don't run out of yarn? That's when adjustable shawls come in handy.

The most important tool: your kitchen scale

The most important tool for any adjustable shawl is a scale. Any digital kitchen scale should be sufficient. Why is it so important? To make sure you won't run out of yarn we have to plan yarn usage accordingly. As we cannot measure the wound skein, we use the weight of it instead.

Read the label on your yarn to find out how many yards / meters are in one skein, and to find out how many grams your skein has. An example: lace weight yarn usually comes in hanks of around 880 yards per 4 oz (800m/100g).

So if we don't want to run out of yarn we have to plan. Let's start.

Adjustable square shawls worked diagonally

square shawls tutorial

The most intuitive form for explaining the principles of adjustable shawls is the square shawl worked diagonally (from tip to tip). The point in knitting where you have to make sure you still got the minimum of half the yarn left is the center diagonal - the position where the increases stop and the decreases start.

In the example pattern below, differences between the original pattern template and the adjustable one are marked green.

Example pattern

Weigh your yarn and write down the number (we call this weight W from now on).

CO 3 sts and purl one round.

Increase row: sl1, m1R, pm, ktbl, pm, m1L, k1. (5 sts)

Next row: knit.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, m1R, slm, ktbl, slm, m1L, k to end of row. (7 sts)

Next row: knit.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 13 sts total, then start shawl body:

Increase row:sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, ktbl, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, k to next marker, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Repeat the last two rows until W/2 grams are left or until desired size.

Decrease row: sl1, k to next marker, slm, ssk, k to 2 sts before next marker, k2tog, slm, k to end of row. (149 sts between markers)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Repeat the last two rows until all increased stitches are decreased again (until 3 sts are left total), then cut yarn, put through stitches and pull tight.

Weave in ends and block gently.

Adjustable stoles

The principle is the same as for square shawls: weigh your yarn and make sure you enter the second half of the shawl before your weight has decreased below half of it.


 << Previous: Rectangle Shawls (Stoles)

>> Next: Triangle Shawls

Coming up next week: triangle shawls. Stay tuned!

So long,

Julia Riede Signature

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Friday Freebies: Orenburg Meets Germany Free Shawl Knitting Pattern

Every Wednesday, the upcoming free pattern of the week is posted on my Instagram (@jriedeknits) and Twitter (@jriedeknits) - feel free to follow me for previews!

Welcome to this week's Friday Freebies here on jriede.com! We all love #fridayfreebies so I'll not let you wait any longer.

Today's free shawl knitting pattern is Orenburg Meets Germany, a square shawl pattern featuring various lace motifs worked from hem to hem.

 

free shawl knitting pattern

You can download the pattern here in the shop for free for the next 24 hours.

yarnhugs_mittel

Feel free to drop me a note if you knit your own version of this lovely shawl, I'd love to see yours. Enjoy your free knitting pattern!

Happy knitting! Feel free to share & spread the word :)

Julia Riede Signature

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design For Everybody: Rectangles (Simple Stole Knitting Pattern)

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

rectangle shawls

Welcome to part four of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today's topic in our shawl design course are rectangle shawls, also known as stoles.

Rectangular shawls can be worked

  • from hem to hem,
  • from center outwards from a provisional cast on, or
  • from tip to tip (diagonally) and then blocked either into rhombi or rectangle shapes.

Today, we only talk about rectangles worked from hem to hem and center outwards. Diamond and rhombus shapes as well as triangle-ended rectangles are subject of posts of their own.

shawl design for everybody

Choose working your shawl from hem to hem if you don't plan to achieve mirror symmetry with respect to the center lengthwise.  If you plan, for example, a large flower as center element in your stole, working from center outwards might be the more suitable choice.

The probably easiest method to create a rectangular shawl (or stole, as commonly called) is working a rectangle with a small border. This border could be a little thing as three stitches of garter, or it could be a lovely little lace border. Please see Fig. 1 for details.

rectangle shawl
Fig. 1: rectangle shawl (stole) with small borders and edging worked in the same direction

 

An exercise for a shawl of this type is the Alpine Fuchsia Stole.

If you want to start with an easier version, omit the small border edgings in the Alpine Fuchsia Stole and replace it by three to five rows garter or moss stitch at the beginning and the end of the shawl.

Pattern template for rectangle shaped shawls

A simple stole knitting pattern reads as follows:

Decide on charts/patterns for the main panel and the border. (If in doubt, use stockinette for the shawl body and seed stitch for the border.) Write down their stitch count per repeat.
Work swatches for each pattern and block them gently, then measure their width and height.

  • Divide the desired width of the shawl by the width of one pattern repeat of the main panel. Round to whole numbers. This will give you N, the number of repeats of the main panel.
  • Divide the desired length of the shawl by the length of one pattern repeat of the main panel. Round to whole numbers. This will give you M, the number of row repeats of the main panel.
  • Cast on two times the number of border stitches plus the number of repeats of the main panel chart times the number of stitches in your main panel chart:
    CO sts = 2*(border stitch count) + N*(center panel stitch count)
  • Work border on the bottom hem of the stole.
  • Work a total of M repeats of your main panel pattern, carrying the border pattern on both sides all up. (If the rows in the main panel pattern are no multiple of the number of rows in the border pattern, consider to add filler sts at the beginning and the end of the shawl.)
  • Work border on the upper hem of the stole.

Rectangular Shawls With Small Borders and Edgings

Figure 2 shows the second possibility for creating a rectangular shawl composed of main panels, small borders and edgings. You can choose to work from the center outwards or from hem to hem. In this version, we have edgings (large borders) on each end of the shawl and small borders on the longer side of the shawl. The small borders are worked at the same time as the main panel. The edgings are worked after the main panels have been finished.

rectangle shawl
Fig. 2: rectangle shawl (stole) with small borders and edging worked from center outwards

An example for knitting from the center outwards is the stole Alpine Fuchsia Stole. An example for stoles worked from center outwards is the knitting pattern Persia Goes Green.

fridayfreebie knitting Persia Goes Green Shawl

Knitting pattern template: rectangular shawl with small borders and edgings

  • Decide on charts/patterns for the main panel and the border. Write down their stitch count per repeat.
  • Work swatches for each pattern and treat them as you would the finished shawl. Measure their width and height.
  • Divide the desired width of the shawl by the width of one pattern repeat of the main panel. Round to whole numbers. This will give you N, the number of repeats of the main panel.
  • Divide the desired length of the shawl by the length of one pattern repeat of the main panel. Round to whole numbers. This will give you M, the number of row repeats of the main panel.
  • Provisionally cast on 2 times the number of border stitches plus the number of repeats of the main panel chart times the number of stitches in your main panel chart:
    [sts to CO] = 2*(border stitch count) + N*(center panel stitch count)
  • Work a total of M repeats of your main panel pattern, carrying the border pattern(s) on both sides all up.
  • Work edgings on both hems of the stole.
Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design for Everybody: Square Shawls Worked Diagonally (Tip to Tip)

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the third episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today's topic in our shawl design course are square shawls worked diagonally.

square shawls tutorial
You are here: square shawls worked diagonally (SQUARE-2 shape)

Working a square shawl diagonally means starting at one tip, increasing to a certain size and repeating the reverse process for the other half of the shawl.

square shawls tutorial
Knitting direction when working square shawls diagonally

As an increase angle of 90° is desired, two stitches need to be increased every other row for the increase section of the shawl body. For the decreases the same principle applies.

In this setup is possible (and common) to work the edging at the same time as the shawl body. Either way, we start with casting on three stitches and increasing continually until the shawl is of desired width at the center diagonal (the position of the widest width).

square shawls tip to tip
When working the edging together with the shawl body, the section outlined in orange has to be worked first during setup.

Design Process Outline

The outline of the shawl design process for square shawls tip to tip is as follows.

  1. Work a swatch and measure gauge.
  2. CO 3 sts and purl one row.
  3. Optional (with edging): work increase rows until edging is of desired width (upper edge of the orange triangle shown above).
  4. Work increase rows until shawl is of desired width.
  5. Work decrease rows until 3 sts are left, then bind off.

shawl design for everybody square shawls

Knitting Pattern Template

Our example assumes we are working a garter stitch edging together with the shawl body. The width of the edging (upper edge of the orange triangle) shall be two inches (one inch per side).

Work a swatch and measure gauge. Example: 5 sts / 6 rows per square inch.

Decide on the desired width at the widest point (diagonal) of the shawl. Example: 30 inches total width (incl. edging).

Calculate the relevant stitch counts: we need 6 stitches per side for the edging, (5 stitches per inch plus one selvedge stitch on the outer side) and

30 inches * 5 stitches/inch = 150 stitches

total width.

So our pattern template reads as follows:


 

CO 3 sts and purl one round.

Increase row: sl1, m1R, pm, ktbl, pm, m1L, k1. (5 sts)

Next row: knit.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, m1R, slm, ktbl, slm, m1L, k to end of row. (7 sts)

Next row: knit.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 13 sts total, then start shawl body:

Increase row:sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, ktbl, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Increase row: sl1, k to next marker, slm, YO, k to next marker, YO, slm, k to end of row. (15 sts)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Repeat the last two rows until there are 151 stitches between the markers.

Decrease row: sl1, k to next marker, slm, ssk, k to 2 sts before next marker, k2tog, slm, k to end of row. (149 sts between markers)

Next row: knit edging stitches, purl body sts.

Repeat the last two rows until all increased stitches are decreased again (until 3 sts are left total), then cut yarn, put through stitches and pull tight.

Weave in ends and block gently.


Our series will be continued tomorrow covering rectangle shawls (also known as stoles). Please check back if you enjoyed this tutorial!

Julia Riede Signature

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Shapes Overview

Starting with the most basic shapes of squares and triangles, my free online course Shawl Design For Everybody helps you navigate through the shawl shape jungle. Want to know when which shawl shape is covered? Here's the course schedule.

shawl shapes - jriede.com

As the schedule for the free online course just lists the shawl shape names, here's your visual guide to the shawl design course and all shawl shapes covered. A PDF version can be found here.

 

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Friday Freebie Pattern Poll: Free Shawl Patterns

Which free shawl pattern do you want to see as this week's Friday Freebie? There are three lovely shawl patterns to choose from this week. Shown from left to right: Orenburg Meets Germany, Hexagon & Alpine Fuchsia Stole.

Which pattern should be the next Friday Freebie?

  • Orenburg Meets Germany (56%, 5 Votes)
  • Alpine Fuchsia Stole (33%, 3 Votes)
  • Hexagon (11%, 1 Votes)

Total Voters: 9

Loading ... Loading ...
Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design For Everybody: Square Shawls Shetland Style (hem to hem)


Want to know which shawl shape is covered when? Find the shawl shape schedule here!


Welcome to the second part of our article series on shawl design of square shawls. Today you are going to learn how to construct square shawls from hem inwards as well as from hem to hem. Examples for this construction method include Shetland and Orenburg Shawls.

shawl design for everybody square shawls

Knitting square shawls: hem to hem versus hem inwards

Knitting square shawls hem to hem or hem in are basically two different construction methods.

Working a shawl hem to hem means working a square of a distinct width from one end to the other and picking up stitches (or use live stitches, respectively) for the edging.

hem_to_hem
Square shawls: working hem to hem, like Shetland or Orenburg shawls

On the other hand, working a shawl hem inwards means to work the edging first, then the shawl body; shaping the shawl into its form by using decreases.

shawl design square
Square shawls: working hem inwards

 Pattern writing: Shetland style shawls (square shawls hem to hem)

The outline for a pattern for a square shawl worked from hem to hem is as follows:

  1. Work a swatch and check your gauge. (Our example uses 5 sts / 6 rows per inch in garter stitch.)
  2. Decide on the side length (one of the four sides of the square) of your shawl. (Let's make it 80 cm in our example).
  3. Based on your gauge, calculate how many stitches you need to cast on and how many rows you need to reach your desired shawl size.
  4. Decide on an edging eventually, and in which direction it shall be worked. (It's pretty much the same as in the last article: sideways or in the round). (Our example uses an edging worked in the round.)

Pattern example: Shetland style shawls

For a side length of 40 inches we need to cast on

40*5 = 200 stitches

and work a total of

40*6 = 240 rows.

So an example pattern could read as follows:

Shawl body

CO 200 stitches (sts) and work 240 rows (120 ridges) of garter stitch.

Edging

Place marker (pm), pick up and knit 200 sts along one side of the shawl body, pm) 3 times, k200.

Increase row: (slip marker (slm), knit into front and back and front of the next stitch (kfbf, 1 stitch increased to 3 sts), knit (k) to next marker) 4 times.

Next row: purl.

Repeat last two rows until edging is of desired size. Bind off all sts loosely and block gently.

Shawls worked from hem inwards

Shawls worked from hem inwards work like a mirror image of the four-panel shawl worked from center out: you start with four times the amount of stitches you need to achieve the desired shawl width (in our example case outlined above we need to either cast on, or pick up from the edging,

4*200 + 4 = 804 stitches

where the four single stitches are the divider stitches used between the panels. Please note that the divider stitches are not mandatory here, as we are not dealing with yarn over increases. But: paired decreases, as used here, tend to leave little holes between them. It's prettier - more even - when panel divider stitches are included.

Pattern example: square shawl worked from hem inwards

CO 804 stitches and join to work in the round, being careful not to twist.

Setup round: (k200, pm, knit through back loop (ktbl), pm) 4 times.

Next round: (knit 2 sts together (k2tog), k to 2 sts before next marker, ssk, slm, ktbl, slm) 4 times.

Next round: knit.

Repeat the last two rounds until 8 sts remain. Cut yarn, pull through live stitches and pull tight. Weave in ends and block gently.

Summary

This article introduced square shawls Shetland style (worked hem to hem) and square shawls worked from hem inwards. Personally, I don't like to work square shawls from hem in so I tend to either work them from center outwards or hem to hem. An example for the latter is my pattern Orenburg Meets Germany.

IMG_8805_medium2

Yes, it's my wedding shawl!


Want to know which shawl shape is covered when? Find the shawl shape schedule here!


The next article covers square shawls worked diagonally and is scheduled for March 25th. Be sure to check back then to read the next article!

Julia Riede Signature

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Shawl Design For Everybody: Shawl Shapes Schedule

Last Thursday my series Shawl Design For Everybody has been introduced. Time to give you an update of our schedule to provide an overview on what shawl shapes I am going to cover in this course. shawl shapes - jriede.com

The names in brackets after each post reflect the covered shawl shapes. For a visual guide to the names used, please see the picture at the bottom of this post (here is a PDF version).

March 21-27: Square shawl shapes

3/21: Square shawls from center out (SQUARE-1)

3/23: Square shawls hem to hem (a.k.a. Shetland & Orenburg style) (SQUARE-1)

3/25: Square shawls worked diagonally (SQUARE-2)

3/26: Rectangles (stoles) (RECT)

3/27: Adjustable square shawls (SQUARE-1, SQUARE-2, RECT)

shawl shapes schedule

March 30 - April 8: Triangle shawl shapes

3/30: Triangle shawls bottom-up (symmetrical increases) (TRIANGLE-1)

4/1: Triangle shawls bottom-up (sideways) (TRIANGLE-2)

4/3: Triangle shawls top-down (TRIANGLE-1)

4/6: Triangle shawls with center panels started from center neck (TRIANGLE-1)

4/7: Rhomboids and rectangles with triangle ends (PARA, TRIA-RECT)

4/8: Adjustable triangle shawls and weekly free shawl knitting pattern (TRIANGLE-1/2, PARA, TRIA-RECT)

April 10 - 17: Circles, circle parts & crescent shawl shapes

4/10: Circle & annular shawls (CIRCLE, RING)

4/13: Circular segments (CIRCLE-SEC, RING-SEC)

4/15: Crescents worked sideways (TRAPEZ)

4/17: Short row crescents (CRESCENTS-1/2)

April 20-22: Stars and polygon shawl shapes

4/20: Star shapes (STAR)

4/22: Polygons (POLY-5/7/N, POLY-SEGMENT)

April 24-27: Faroese shawls and wing-type triangle shawl shapes

4/24: Faroese shawls (FAROESE)

4/27: Elongated (wing-type) triangles (TRIA-ELONG-1/2)

April 29 - May 5: Innovative and uncommon shawl shapes

4/29: Vortex shawls (VORTEX-1/2)

5/1: Shawls with slits

5/4: The ultimate exotics: really weird & beautiful shawl shapes (S-CURVE, MOD-STAR)

 

Do you miss a shape? Just let me know!

I hope you'll enjoy the series. Happy knitting!

Julia Riede Signature

 

Sharing is caring :)
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •