Adjustable Shawls

all about adjustable shawls

Welcome to Adjustable Shawls!

In this blog post series you are going to learn everything about adjustable shawls: how to create them, how to make specific shawl shapes adjustable, how to turn existing shawl knitting patterns into adjustable shawl patterns and much more.

What Are Adjustable Shawls?

An adjustable shawl is a shawl where you can freely decide how many repeats you knit and no matter how many repeats you decide to work, the design still works. Adjustable shawls are adaptable in size and yarn usage can be calculated in advance so left-overs can be minimized.

all about adjustable shawls

Adjustable Shawls: The Course Schedule

  • What Makes a Shawl Adjustable? (Sep 5)
  • Adjustable Square Shawls (Sep 8)
  • Adjustable Stoles (Sep 11)
  • Adjustable Triangle Shawls (Sep 14)
  • Adjustable Circular Shawls (Sep 17)
  • Adjustable Rhomboid Shawls (Sep 20)
  • Adjustable Faroese Shawls (Sep 23)
  • Adjustable Vortex and Swirl Shawls (Sep 26)
  • Converting Existing Patterns Into Adjustable Shawl Knitting Patterns (Sep 29)
  • Example Patterns

I’m looking forward to working through the adjustable shawls course with you!

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How To Create a Knitting Pattern, Day 14: Checklist

How To Create Knitting Patterns, Day 14: Checklist

Are you a knitter dying to create your own knitting patterns but don’t have a clue where to start? Make yourself comfortable: let’s get you started on my tutorial series on how to create a knitting pattern. Feeling lost? Find the article series overview here!


Welcome to Day 14 of the Knitting Pattern How To series! Today, we are creating a knitting pattern checklist and walk through it step by step.

How To Create Knitting Patterns, Day 14: Checklist

 

Implementing Processes

In the last post in this series, I talked about proven processes in the creation, testing and publication stages of knitting pattern creation and the importance to define and follow these processes. The ultimate goal are error-free knitting patterns, and implementing processes helps us achieving it. So what we are going to do is creating a checklist to follow during the creation of knitting patterns as an implementation of these processes.

The check lists are actually two: one general one to implement before you create the first pattern, and one applicable for each single knitting pattern you create.

Checklist I: The General Checklist

  1. Create your own knitting pattern template.
    • Using the post on Knitting Pattern Templates (day 12 of this series) as a basis, implement your own knitting pattern template.
    • You might want to create one template for each item category. A pattern template for a shawl has  different sections than one for a sweater, for instance.
    • Create an empty template with your favorite software and use it for each and every pattern from now on.
    • Don’t limit yourself to a static template: in case your template turns out to be incomplete or otherwise not ideal, improve it as necessary. Listen to your customers and their suggestions.
  2. Create a style guide.
    • Decide which font(s) and font sizes to be used.
    • Define a set of colors (also called a color scheme, or palette) to be used in your patterns. Colored section headers are a good way to a clearly structured pattern, for instance.
    • Agree on abbreviations to be used.
    • Define common knitting pattern elements (e.g., listing of yarns to be used) to include.

 Checklist II: Knitting Pattern Creation

  1. Does the yarn selection match the item? (e.g. no usage of bulky weight warm wool for summer items)
  2. Did you use yarns which are readily available? If not, did you provide alternatives?
  3. Did you knit a swatch?
  4. Does the swatch fabric match the intended use of the pattern?
  5. Do you like the yarn/pattern combination in your swatch?
  6. Did you knit a swatch big enough to make sure you get your math right? (If your swatch is too small, rounding errors might pile up)
  7. Has your pattern been tested exhaustively?
  8. Does your pattern follow your style guide?
  9. Did you use your pattern template?
  10. Are your pattern pictures clear, in focus, and do they show all relevant details?
  11. Is all information needed to knit the item provided in your pattern?
  12. Is your name stated clearly on the pattern?
  13. Are your website/blog and your social network profiles (Twitter, …) stated on the pattern?
  14. Does your pattern provide any information on copyright?
  15. Did you provide a short bio and eventually a picture of yourself?

I’m sure there is more – I always keep forgetting important bits and pieces. Tell me if you find something or have a suggestion!

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<< Day 13: Quality Control | Day 15: Publishing your pattern >>

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Friday Freebie Pattern Poll: Free Knitting Patterns For Shawls

free knitting patterns for shawls friday freebies

Which free shawl pattern do you want to see as this week’s Friday Freebie? There are three lovely free knitting patterns for shawls to choose from this week. Shown from top to bottom: Ester, Hannah und Dora.

friday freebies free knitting patterns for shawls ester

Hannah free knitting patterns for shawls

FFPa Dora

 

 

Vote here for your preferred free knitting patterns for shawls to be featured in this week’s Friday Freebie!

Which pattern should be the next Friday Freebie?

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Happy voting :) #fridayfreebie

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free knitting patterns for shawls poll

 

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Friday Freebies: White Atlantic Free Shawl Knitting Pattern

FFPa White Atlantic

Welcome to this week’s Friday Freebies here on jriede.com! The free pattern poll this week had a clear winner – thanks to all who voted! We all love #fridayfreebies so I’ll not let you wait any longer.

Today’s free knitting pattern is White Atlantic, a knitting pattern for a stole featuring traditional Shetland lace motifs.

FFPa White Atlantic

You can download the free shawl knitting pattern in the shop for the next 24 hours.

yarnhugs_mittel

Feel free to drop me a note if you knit your own version of this lovely shawl, I’d love to see yours. Enjoy your free shawl knitting pattern!

Happy knitting! Feel free to share & spread the word :)

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Basic Knitting Techniques: Different Methods to Cast On

cast on methods in knitting

I’ve been asked which method I’m using for a provisional cast on recently which inspired me to start my 30 Days To Better Knitting series with an article about cast on techniques.

All knitters seems to have their favorite cast on method – usually the first one they learned – and tend to stick to it. My favorite is also the most commonly used one: the long tail cast on.

Long Tail Cast On

The long tail cast on is one of the most common cast-on methods because it’s extremely versatile. While it helps create an even edge, which can sometimes be difficult to create with the single cast-on method (see below), it’s also a great cast on method to use on projects in which you may want a fairly elastic edging. You can find lots of tutorials on how to do a long tail cast on on YouTube.

The major drawback is that you have to be able to estimate the amount of yarn you’ll need for your cast on row at the very start of your project: if you use too little yarn, you’ll run out of yarn in the middle of your cast on and find that you have to undo your work and start over. Annoying! However, if you use too much yarn, you could end up wasting quite a bit that could be useful later on in your project eventually.

Single Cast On

The single cast on method, also known as the backwards loop method, is very popular among beginning knitters. It’s easy to learn, easy to teach, and can be done quite quickly. There are a lot of video tutorials on the single cast on on YouTube.

It has got a drawback though: it can make knitting your first row very difficult, as it’s hard to keep an even tension. The little back loops are just difficult to catch evenly.

Provisional Cast On

The provisional cast on gets used a lot in my patterns, especially when shawls are started with a small part of the neck band and picked up stitches.

I usually do my provisional cast on as follows: I long tail cast on with waste yarn, work the first row with waste yarn and change to the working yarn from there. I use it because I find it very convenient.

Alternatively, I have been using crochet cast on: chain crochet the number of stitches plus two or three additional chain loops, then pick up and knit with working yarn from the chain loops.

cast on methods in knitting

Can’t I Just Do a Normal Cast On Instead Of a Provisional One?

Theoretically yes, but you will spot the cast on edge in the finished item, especially when dealing with wider edges. When working smaller edges, like in my pattern Redwing for instance, you could go without – just cast on normally, with a long tail cast on for instance, and pick up the few stitches from the cast on edge – it’s barely noticeable as there are so few stitches and this part of the neckband is not shown prominently.

What’s your favorite cast on method and why?

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