Shawl Design: Faroese Shawls

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are Faroese shawls.

Faroese Shawls

Faroese shawls are my all-time favorite. They look like wings and due to their shape it’s easy to tie them behind your back, providing you with extra warmth during cold winter days. Traditionally they were worked in thicker yarns and often they were lined making them a piece of everyday clothing. The figure below shows a sketch of the shape of a Faroese shawl.

A very good book on Faroese shawls is Føroysk Bindingarmynstur / Faroese Knitting Patterns, published by Schoolhouse Press.

Construction Methods For Faroese Shawls

Faroese shawls can be constructed in three different ways:

  • By working them top-down and working increases the traditional Faroese way,
  • By working them bottom-up and working decreases the traditional Faroese way, and
  • By working them top-down and working raglan increases.
Faroese shawl knitting pattern
Another example for a Faroese shawl: the Royals knitting pattern (available in my shop).

 

Traditional Faroese Shawl Construction

Traditional Faroese Shawls are constructed by working increases (if you decide to work top-down) or decreases (if you decide to work bottom-up) at certain points of the shawl additionally to the decreases similar to those worked in triangle shaped shawls. The amount and positions of the in-/decreases depend on of the exact shape of the shawl you want to create, but generally there are two to four of these rows present.

An example pattern for a traditional shaped Faroese shawl is the Redwing knitting pattern.

Pattern Template: Traditional Faroese Shawl

For working a traditional Faroese Shawl follow the recipe for a triangular shawl. Choose a center pattern that is small at the neck (around 10 stitches). At the same time, work the following additional increases:

  • At the center panel, work 3 increases every 16 rows (stop increasing when your center panel is abut 40 sts wide).
  • At the side panels, work additional increases as follows:
    • At row 41, increase every 3rd stitch by working YO, k1 instead of k1.
    • At row 81, increase every 7th stitch by working YO, k1 instead of k1.
    • At row 120, increase every 9th stitch by working YO, k1 instead of k1.

Our next topic is going to be wing edge triangle shawls. Check back soon if you enjoyed this article!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Star Shaped Shawls| next: Wing Edge Triangles Shawls (5/4) >

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Friday Freebies: Johanna Alpine Knit Stockings

Every Wednesday, the upcoming free pattern of the week is posted on my Instagram (@jriedeknits) and Twitter (@jriedeknits) – feel free to follow me for previews!

Welcome to this week’s Friday Freebies here on jriede.com! We all love #fridayfreebies so I’ll not let you wait any longer.

Today’s free knitting pattern is Johanna, a knitting pattern for a pair of knee-height socks featuring various Alpine lace motifs worked toe-up.

Johanna Free Sock Pattern

 

You can download the free Faroese shawl knitting pattern here in the shop for the next 24 hours.

yarnhugs_mittel

Feel free to drop me a note if you knit your own version of this lovely alpine knit stockings, I’d love to see yours. Enjoy your free knitting pattern!

Happy knitting! Feel free to share & spread the word :)

Julia Riede Signature

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Shawl Design: Star Shaped Shawls

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are star shaped shawls.

polygon shaped shawls

Star shaped shawls are constructed by combining polygon shaped shawls (as discussed yesterday) with triangles (discussed a few weeks ago in detail). Start with a polygon, then attach one triangle to each polygon panel to form a star.

star shaped shawls
Star shaped shawls: construction method for an 8-corner star shaped shawl

 

Pattern Template: Polygon Shaped Shawl (Eight Corners)

  • CO 16 sts and join to work in the round, being careful not to twist.
  • Next round: *k1, pm, ktbl, pm* all around. (16 sts)
  • Next round: *YO, k1, YO, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (32 sts)
  • Next round: *k to next marker, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (32 sts)
  • Next round: *YO, k to next marker, YO, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (48 sts)
  • Repeat the last two rounds until inner part of the star shawl is of desired size (approximately half of the diameter of the finished shawl).
  • Start working back and forth now: work one triangle per polygon panel, decreasing at the same amount as increased in the polygon.
  • Optionally: Work an edging.
  • Bind off all sts loosely.

For star segments, the process is similar – just work back & forth instead of in the round and omit some of the panels. Work four panels for a half-circle, for example!

Our next topic is going to be Faroese shawls. Check back tomorrow if you enjoyed this article!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Polygon Shaped Shawls| next: Faroese Shawls (4/24) >

 

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Shawl Design: Polygon Shaped Shawls

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are polygon shaped shawls.

polygon shaped shawls

Polygons are best worked center out. The amount of increases and their position depends on the number of corners you want to see in your specific polygon shape.

The principle is as follows: a whole circle has 360° and we are dividing this virtual circle into slices – much like cutting a cake or pizza into pieces. How many pieces you want to achieve determines the angle to cut (or in our case: to increase!).

polygon shaped shawls
Polygon shaped shawls: an example with eight corners

In our example, we would like to achieve eight corners. This means we have to divide 360° by 8, resulting in 45° per piece (of the shawl cake). As discussed earlier (and I definitely have to write the article on increase angles soon, I hear you!), increasing two stitches every other round results in an increase angle of approximately 90° – To achieve 45° per slice, 360° in total, we need to increase 8 stitches every other row.

Now all is left to do is to divide them evenly to shape this polygon. remember the article on working squarte shawls center out? This basically has been a four-corner polygon! The same principle applies here. We use one stitch as divider per panel and increase around this panel divider stitch ( I mostly tend to use ktbl’s here).

Pattern Template: Polygon Shaped Shawl (Eight Corners)

  • CO 16 sts and join to work in the round, being careful not to twist.
  • Next round: *k1, pm, ktbl, pm* all around. (16 sts)
  • Next round: *YO, k1, YO, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (32 sts)
  • Next round: *k to next marker, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (32 sts)
  • Next round: *YO, k to next marker, YO, slm, ktbl, slm* all around. (48 sts)
  • Repeat the last two rounds until shawl is of desired size.
  • Optionally: Work an edging.
  • Bind off all sts loosely.

For polygon segments, the process is similar – just work back & forth instead of in the round and omit some of the panels. Work four panels for a half-circle, for example!

Our next topic is going to be star shaped shawls. Check back tomorrow if you enjoyed this article!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Short Row Crescent Shawls| next: Star Shaped Shawls >

 

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Friday Freebie Pattern Poll: Free Knitting Patterns For Stockings

Which free shawl pattern do you want to see as this week’s Friday Freebie? There are three lovely free shawl patterns to choose from this week. Shown from top to bottom: Anton, Johanna and Schneeflocke.

Anton socks knitting pattern
Anton sock knitting pattern

 

Johanna Knitting Pattern
Johanna sock knitting pattern

 

Schneeflocke free knitting patterns for stockings
Schneeflocke sock knitting pattern

Vote here for your preferred free knitting patterns for stockings to be featured in this week’s Friday Freebie!

Which pattern should be the next Friday Freebie?

  • Johanna (62%, 8 Votes)
  • Schneeflocke (38%, 5 Votes)
  • Anton (0%, 0 Votes)

Total Voters: 13

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Shawl Design: Short Row Crescent Shawls

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are crescent shawls worked sideways.

how to knit crescent shawls

Implementing short rows into the shawls main panel forms crescents. The problem with short row shaping is that usually lace charts and short rows do not work well together, so usually the main panel of crescents is worked using garter or stockinette stitch.

Crescents can be both worked top-down or bottom up, as you please. It’s also possible to work crescent shawls sideways – we learned how to knit crescent shawls sideways last week.

Pattern Template: Crescent Shawls Worked Bottom Up

An example for a simple little Crescent shawl is the shawl pattern Priscilla.

(Note: in the recipe below, the term “turning point” refers to point at which previous short row was turned.)

  • Work a swatch in the desired needles and yarn to determine your working gauge.
  • Calculate how many stitches you will need to reach the desired width at the lower hem of the shawl and cast on this number of stitches.
  • Work about 16 rows in pattern for the lower hem – for example, work any lace border.
  • Decrease about one third of your CO sts evenly over the next 4 rows. Count your stitches (=A) at the last row.
  • Calculate B = (A-10)/2+10 and round to whole numbers.
  • (RS) sl1, knit B sts, turn work.
  • (WS) p10, turn work.
  • (RS) k9, ssk, k3, turn work.
  • (WS) p12, p2tog, p3, turn work.
  • (RS) k to 1 st before last turning point, ssk, k3, turn work.
  • (WS) p to 1 st before last turning point, p2tog, p3, turn work.
  • Repeat the last two rows until less than three sts remain un-worked at each edge.
  • K to last 2 sts, k2tog, turn work.
  • P to last 2 sts, p2tog, turn work.
  • Repeat the last two rows if you had 2 sts left un-worked at each edge; otherwise you are done.
  • Bind off all sts loosely.

Free Knitting Pattern Priscilla Crescent Shawl

Pattern Template: Crescent Shawls Worked Top Down

  • Work a swatch in the desired needles and yarn to determine your working gauge.
  • Calculate how many stitches (=A) you will need to reach the desired width at the upper hem of the shawl and cast on this number of stitches.
  • (RS) sl 1, k to last 3 sts, m1, turn work.
  • (WS) sl 1, p to last 3 sts, m1, turn work.
  • (RS) sl 1, k to three sts before turning point, m1, turn work.
  • (WS) sl 1, p to 3 sts before last turning point, m1, turn work.
  • Repeat the last two rows until you have about 10 stitches between your two turning points.
  • Calculate D by multiplying your current stitch count (=C) by 3/2: D = 3/2 * C.
  • Calculate E = D – C.
  • Increase E sts over the next 4 rows.
  • Work edging (or about 16 rows in garter st).
  • Bo all sts loosely.

Our next topic is going to be star shaped shawls. Check back tomorrow if you enjoyed this article!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Crescent Shawls Worked Sideways| next: Polygon Shaped Shawls  >

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Friday Freebies: Raglan Faroese Shawl Knitting Pattern

Every Wednesday, the upcoming free pattern of the week is posted on my Instagram (@jriedeknits) and Twitter (@jriedeknits) – feel free to follow me for previews!

Welcome to this week’s Friday Freebies here on jriede.com! We all love #fridayfreebies so I’ll not let you wait any longer.

Today’s free knitting pattern is Raglan Faroese, a knitting pattern for a Faroese lace shawl featuring various lace motifs worked from top down.

Free Knitting Pattern Raglan Faroese Shawl

 

You can download the free Faroese shawl knitting pattern here in the shop for the next 24 hours.

yarnhugs_mittel

Feel free to drop me a note if you knit your own version of this lovely shawl, I’d love to see yours. Enjoy your free knitting pattern!

Happy knitting! Feel free to share & spread the word :)

Julia Riede Signature

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WIP Wednesday: Lace Knitting Yarn The Green Way

nb_IMG_4487

WIP Wednesday comes a little late this week but better late thank never! Currently, I’m working on a lovely little wing ended triangle lace shawl. Lace knitting yarn is a Silk/Seacell blend in subtle hand dyed shades of green.

lace knitting WIP

I hope to finish by the end of this week so I can start looking for test knitters. Just drop me an email or contact me on Twitter, Facebook or via comment here if you’re interested!

nb_IMG_4456

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How To Knit Crescent Shawls Worked Sideways

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are crescent shawls worked sideways.

how to knit crescent shawls

Pattern Design Outline

  • Decide on the desired width and work a gauge swatch to determine the number of stitches (=N) needed.
  • Cast on approximately half of this number of stitches (approx. N/2 sts)
  • Work increase rows until the desired stitch count is reached.
  • Work straight rows until shawl is of desired length, then
  • Work decrease rows until approximately N/2 sts are left.

eaded Shawls knitting patterns

Pattern Template: Crescents Worked Sideways

  • Work a gauge swatch to determine the number of stitches for the final width of your shawl (=N). CO N/2 sts and work 4 rows in pattern.
  • Sl 1, k1, pm, ssk, work to last 4 sts in pattern, m1l, pm, k2.
  • Sl 1, k1, slm, purl to next marker, slm, p2.
  • Sl 1, k1, slm, work in pattern to next marker, m1l, slm, k2.
  • Sl 1, k1, slm, purl to next marker, slm, p2.
  • Repeat the last two rows until your crescent is of desired width. Record the number of rows worked until desired width (=A).
  • Work in pattern without decreases and increases for about 15cm.
  • Sl1, k1, slm, m1r, work in pattern to 2 sts before next marker, k2tog, slm, k2.
  • Sl 1, work in pattern to next marker, slm, p2.
  • Calculate B=A-2 and repeat the last two rows B times.
  • BO all sts loosely.

Our next topic is going to be short row crescent shawls. Check back tomorrow if you enjoyed this article!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Circular Segment Shawls| next: Short Row Crescent Shawls >

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Shawl Design: Circular Segment Shawls

Feeling lost? Find the course schedule here or have a look at the overview of all shapes covered in the course.

Welcome to the next episode of my Shawl Design for Everybody series! Today’s topic in our shawl design course are circular segment shawl patterns.

shawl design: week 3

Circular Shawls

Circular shawls are best worked from the center outwards, that also holds for circle segment shawls. Yesterday we learned how to construct circular and annular shawls. Today, we are using this new knowledge to construct circle segment shawls.

A circle segment is a part of a circle. Imagine a clock: to form a whole circle, the clock hand has to go all around one time – 360° to form a circle. If the clock hand goes from three to nine, we get a half circle like the one shown below.

shawl design circle segment shawls
A half circle, constructed from center out, based on the Pi shawl construction method

If the clock hand goes from three to six o’clock only, we get a quarter circle like the one shown below.

shawl design: quarter circle segment shawl shapes
Shawl Design: A quarter circle segment shawl construction, based on the Pi shawl construction method.

 

This considerations lead to the following pattern template.

Pattern Template: Circular Segment Shawl Patterns

Calculate how many stitches (=N) to cast on based on 36 sts for 360° ( a whole circle). How many degrees should your shawl design have? A half circle would be 180° or 18 sts; a quarter circle 90° or 9 sts, etc. (Additionally, you might want to check your gauge, too.)

  • CO N sts.
  • Work N rows (not in the round!)
  • Work increase round (double stitch count) (2*N sts)
  • Work 2*N rows
  • Work increase round (double stitch count) (4*N sts)
  • Work 4*N rows

Repeat working in this schema until your shawl is of desired size, then work an edging (garter stitch border or something more complicated, as you please) and bind off loosely. Block gently.

Liked this tutorial? Tomorrow, we are going to cover crescent shawls worked sideways. Stay tuned!

Happy knitting,

Julia Riede Signature

 

 

< Circular Shawl Patterns & Annular Shawls| next: Crescent Shawls Worked Sideways (4/15) >

 

 

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